Posts Tagged ‘The I’

Nietzsche, Academy Schools, and Elitism in Education

March 30, 2016

Mike and a number of other bloggers have wondered recently if the Tories’ own enthusiasm for privatising education and turning all schools into Academies aren’t a deliberate attempt to ‘dumb down’ education. Despite all the hype, and mendacious graphs in the Torygraph to the contrary, privately run Academies actually perform worse than state schools managed by the local authorities. Mike speculated that the Tories wanted the children of the hoi polloi – the working and lower middle classes – have an inferior education as they were afraid that the masses were becoming too bright, too well-education, and they didn’t want the competition. After all, they could hardly retain their places as the leaders of society, thanks to their extremely moneyed parents sending them to Eton and the other public and fee-paying schools, if a bunch of comprehensive school oiks actually were demonstrably more intelligent and better educated than they were.

And there is certainly some evidence that the latter is true. A year ago, the Independent and the I ran a story that students from state schools actually did better at uni than those from the private schools. How ghastly! Especially as the introduction of tuition fees and their increase to truly extortionate levels really does seem to suggest that there is a section of right-wing opinion that believes higher education should be the exclusive preserve of the wealthy few.

The German philosopher Nietzsche also took this view. He was afraid that if the masses became too well-educated, it would lead to a decline in cultural standards. The historian Gordon A. Craig describes his elitist view of education, and that of his successors in Germany: 1866 – 1945 (Oxford: OUP 1978). He wrote

(A)nd some widely read publicists expressed the view that the emphasis placed on the education of the masses was dangerous because it could not avoid diluting the quality of German education in general. This was the view of Friedrich Nietzsche, who in a remarkable series of lectures, ‘On the Future of our Education Institutions’, delivered in Basle in 1872, stated that ‘not the education of the masses can be our goal but the education of individually selected people, armed for great and permanent achievements’ and went on to charge that those who argued for a further extension of Volksbildung were seeking to destroy ‘the natural order of rank in the kingdom of the intellect’. Nietzsche’s views were repeated with variations by Paul de Lagarde, an embittered eccentric who saw German culture imperilled by the advance of barbarism and blamed this on the educational system, and Julius Langbehn, the author of the extremely popular Rembrandt als Erzieher (1890), whose insistence upon the necessity of training a racially pure elite was later to take more extreme forms in the educational practices of Heinrich Himmler.

De Lagarde and Langbehn were two of the 19th century intellectual precursors of the Nazis. The German elementary schools were called Volksschulen – People’s Schools. The Germans had had an excellent school system of primary education from the 18th century onwards. If children couldn’t go to church schools, then they had to go to state schools. As a result, illiteracy in Germany by the end of the 19th century was very, very low – about 0.05%, compared with 3-4% in England and France.

Nietzsche’s ideas might have been a novelty for Germany, but until comparatively late in the 19th century they were common amongst the British ruling class. There was some education available for the working classes in the Sunday and Dame schools, but these were by no means widespread, and standards could be very poor. The dame schools have been criticised as essentially a place where parents could send their children while they were at work trying to make a living. As a whole, the education system was geared to training an aristocratic elite for careers in government. It looks very much like this is what the Tories intend now in their eagerness to privatise schools and so create an education system that will leave children worse educated, not better.

Cameron, Osbo, Thicky Nikki and the rest of the Tory party are either aristos, or very middle class. It really does look like they are trying to drag Britain back into the 19th century, where the workers were given just enough education to satisfy the requirements of industry, while a good education, and the career opportunities that went with it, were the exclusive prerogative of the middle and upper classes. This was challenged by the Labour party, who wanted the education reformed and expanded so that more people from the lower middle and working classes had the opportunity to acquire it and so enjoy the same career opportunities and social privileges as the wealthy. It can be seen in chapter IX of G.D.H. Cole’s book, Britain in the Post-War World – ‘Education for Democracy’, for example. It’s the reason Anthony Crossland set up and championed comprehensive schools, because the existing system of grammar and secondary modern schools were elitist, and kept the working class in their place in the manual trades.

And so far from striking a blow for meritocracy, it increasingly seems to me that the privatisation of the education system begun nearly thirty years ago by Thatcher really is indeed to keep the masses in their place, and make sure that only the elite can afford an educational standard that will guarantee them their place of leadership in society. All under the guise of delivering quality, which can only be provided by private industry, of course.

The Young Turks on the Dwindling Audience for Cable News

February 14, 2016

This is a very interesting piece pointing to the future of the news media from The Young Turks’ anchor, John Iadarola. Iadarola states that the Turks are always warning their audience to be wary of cable news because of its bias: its support for whoever happens to be in power at the time, its defence of powerful corporate interests and the establishment. But it seems that there may not be anything to worry about for much longer, according to figures about where the different generations in American society get their news.

In a poll inquiring where Americans were getting the news of the present presidential election campaign, amongst 18 to 29 year olds, 35% said they got their news from social media. 18% said they got it from news websites and apps, 12% from cable news, 11% from radio and 10% from local TV.

Adults over 30 primarily relied on cable news, and for adults 50 and older, the proportion getting their news from cable was 43%; network nightly news 17% and local TV 10%. Collectively, cable TV has 24% of the total audience across the generations for news.

To Iadarola, however, the message behind these figures is very clear. While cable TV is the news source of choice for more mature viewers, its influence with the young is waning. These are the people, who are still forming their political opinions, and they are going to vote in more elections than the over 65s. The future’s with the internet, in other words, not cable, despite cables massive budgets, traditional dominance of the media, and ability to get the presidential candidates on air.

While this clearly is about Americans’ viewing habits, it has profound implications for British television and news media as well. More and more people on this side of the Atlantic are turning to the Net for their news, with the result that newspapers have massively declining readerships. On Friday the Independent announced that it would cease printing, and its sister publication, the I, was to be sold off. The Guardian is similarly losing about £45 million every year, and the Torygraph is also in trouble. In its case, this has much to do with its ‘doddery’ chief executive, Murdoch McLellan, not understanding the way the internet works, and appointing advisors who know even less, as well as its craven grovelling towards its advertisers, as commanded by the weirdo Barclay Twins. It also shot itself in the foot by ordering its readers to go out and join the Labour party to get Corbyn elected for the benefit of the Tories.

Not even the Times is immune. The paper’s also losing money hand over fist, and it’s been said that the time is long gone when it would have been axed in the normal course of events. It hasn’t, because it is supposed to be the paper of record, and its ownership gives Rupert Murdoch a place at the political table with the premier and other leading politicians.

Television is also feeling the bite from the Internet, with the Beeb also looking worried about competition from cyberspace. So much so that one article in the Radio Times mooted abandoning the policy of impartiality to produce biased news like Fox, which at least has an audience. This piece shows that Fox does indeed have an audience, but possibly not for much longer. Somebody did a poll of the average age of Fox viewers. Their average ago is 69. Somebody jocularly called them an on-line retirement community.

Satellite and cable TV in Britain now has a much larger audience than it did previously, and people are turning to the internet to watch blockbusting series like House of Cards or Game of Thrones. But my guess is that in Britain, at least, the main TV channels are just about managing to hold their own. Just about.

This means that I suspect that there will be increased interest by American broadcasters to buy into British TV. Channel 5 has been bought up by the Americans, and Rupert Murdoch would desperately, desperately like the Beeb privatised so his empire of filth can move in. (I say that, but actually I like the X Files, so I’ll make an exception for Mulder and Scully). Expert even more demands from the Murdoch press for the Beeb to be sold off in the coming months and years. Murdoch and the other cable barons have got their backs to the wall, and the internet is coming up to bite them.

Mike on Yesterdays ‘Million Mask March’ against the Beeb

November 6, 2014

Mike over at Voxpoliticalonline has posted this piece on the ‘Million Mask’ demo against the Beeb’s continuing censorship and falsification of the news. It begins

‘Million Mask March’ leads to Broadcasting House lockdown

Now why do you think the BBC’s headquarters at New Broadcasting House were locked down while angry people in masks inspired by V for Vendetta protested outside?

Did BBC bosses feel that the accuracy of their reporting was a thorn in the side of the anonymous thousands outside, who had gathered to protest against austerity, mass surveillance, oppression and unconstitutional government? This is hardly likely, as they could not even get right the identity of the character the marchers were emulating.

The BBC’s news story was headlined Thousands take part in London ‘Guy Fawkes’ protest but the masks are in fact worn in imitation of V, the lead character in Alan Moore’s story about an anarchist who engineers the downfall of a fascist British government in a near-future England (the rest of the UK having been destroyed in a catastrophe). The march takes place on November 5 because that is when V starts his campaign (by blowing up the Houses of Parliament – hence the Guy Fawkes mask that he wears).

The article is at http://voxpoliticalonline.com/2014/11/06/million-mask-march-leads-to-broadcasting-house-lockdown/

Now I have to say that while the Beeb may have put it on the news, I don’t recall seeing it in either Independent yesterday or today’s I, though it is up on the MSN news. I notice on the Beeb’s website it’s only under London news, thus hiding from the rest of the country the fact that people are marching against Britain’s state-owned, national broadcaster. Clearly, this is all a bit too politically embarrassing for the authorities.

As for their failure to connect it with the film, ‘V for Vendetta’ or its comic book predecessor, you can see that as an example of how disconnected and out of touch the Beeb’s news team is with popular culture. Or, alternatively, the Beeb really is afraid of making an explicit connection to the Alan Moore’s cult creation, in the fear that it will resonate with even more of the disaffected masses let down by a corrupt television media serving a Fascistic state.