Posts Tagged ‘Suspensions’

Vox Political: Jeremy Corbyn Warns Suspensions May Be Bringing Labour into Disrepute

August 29, 2016

Mike also put up another article, which shows that Jeremy Corbyn has taken notice of the attempts to suspend people without giving them a specific reason, and has warned the leadership of the harmful consequences this may have on the party’s reputation, and for those, who are personally responsible for the suspensions. The Guardian published an article stating that Corbyn had written to Iain McNicol, the Labour party general secretary, warning that the suspensions are damaging the party’s reputation. He has called on the party secretary and his staff to uphold the principles of natural justice advocated by Shami Chakrabarti in her report on anti-Semitism and racism in the party. She recommended that suspended members should be given a timeline in which their case would be dealt with, and should be told who their accuser is and the reasons for their suspension. The Labour leader has called for a meeting of the party’s equalities committee to discuss in early September before the conclusion of the leadership contest.

Mike concludes that Corbyn’s message appears to be a not very coded warning that if they continue to damage the party’s reputation in this way, they themselves may find themselves suspended.

Corbyn warns ‘suspension without explanation’ is bringing Labour Party officers into disrepute

Of course, Corbyn and Chakrabarti are entirely correct. It is simple, natural justice that anyone accused of an offence should be told what it is, given an opportunity to defend themselves, and know who their accuser is. It is precisely the fact that so many of the people, who have been suspended by the Blairites haven’t been told the reasons for their suspension, or the identity of those making the complaint, nor given the opportunity to refute the allegation. I’ve stated before that this turns the whole process into a Stalinist, Kafkaesque travesty. Those who are guilty of running this kangaroo court should themselves be challenged, and face the consequences themselves of their actions in destroying the party’s own culture of democracy, its reputation, and that of their colleagues.

Kipper Bill Etheridge Wants Return of Caning in Schools

March 20, 2015

This is another meme from the Hope Not Hate Facebook page, The Real UKIP, I found over at the SlatUKIP site.

Etheridge Corporal Punishment

UKIP’s candidate for the West Midlands, Bill Etheridge, amongst his other bizarre and reactionary views, wishes to see the return of corporal punishment in schools.

He isn’t the only one. A lot of people of a certain age get misty-eyed and nostalgic for the old days of corporal punishment. ‘I got the cane’, they say, ‘and it never did me any harm.’ In their view, only the threat of corporal punishment will solve the problem of the lack of discipline, disruptive and even violent behaviour in schools.

This is a real problem, and you can hear some horrifying stories of teachers that have been physically attacked, sometimes suffering serious injury, by aggressive and violent pupils. There have even been notorious cases where a teacher has been murdered by one of their pupils.

To add insult to injury, teachers are further demoralised by the lack of support given by their headmasters and politicians. One teacher, who wrote about his experiences spending a year as a supply teacher in some of the poorest performing schools, described how demoralising it was, when, after complaining about a violent or aggressive pupil, the headmaster called them into examine the situation. Rather than disciplining the pupil, the head teacher simply took the approach that the teacher must some how have been also wrong.

And when the authorities have been asked how teachers are supposed to deal with disruptive pupils when the only sanctions they have against them are suspension and expulsion, their response has simply been to say something on the lines of ‘Be better teachers.’

This is simply not good enough.

Corporal punishment, however, probably isn’t the answer. If you also talk to member of the older generation, you can also hear some grim stories about what it was like at school in the mid-twentieth century, when teachers had the power to strike and beat their charges. My father went to one of the better schools in Somerset, and he describes some of the teaching staff there as violent sadists. Apart from caning and blows for even the most minor infraction, he also describes how one teacher, exasperated by one pupil’s lack of understanding in the French class, threw the lad out of a window.

The great Irish comedian, Dave Allen, was an atheist, who was very critical at times of the Roman Catholic church. He once explained his dislike of the Church came from his experience of the extremely strict discipline he’d endured as a pupil at one of the Church’s schools in Ireland. Hence remarks like, ‘The nuns – God’s stormtroopers.’

Other TV personalities have had the same experience. Terry Wogan, one of Britain’s favourite broadcasters, was on cable/ satellite TV this week in a half-hour programme about his home country. He was touring the land of Ireland, from Eire to Ulster, in a taxi, taking in Dublin, Limerick, Galway, Londonderry/Derry, and Belfast. In one episode, he returned to his old school, meeting up with his old school friends, and chewing the fat about their experiences. Like Dave Allen, he described how the school, in the person of Fr. McGlochglan, tried to put the fear of God into their students. He stated that, rather than strengthening his faith, it left him with no great love for the Church and its teachings. Later, talking to a priest, who he used to have on his radio show in Ireland, El Tel said he was an atheist.

I’ve heard much the same from members of my own family. One of my uncles was lapsed Roman Catholic. Although technically a member of the Church, he never practised because he had been put off by the viciousness of the monks, who taught him at school.

And it wasn’t just the Roman Catholic church. One of my friends had the dubious benefit of being privately educated. I can remember being surprised by his views on corporal punishment when I was talking about the issue one day at College. My friend is certainly no rebellious firebrand by any stretch of the imagination, yet he was firmly against the return of corporal punishment because of the sadistic behaviour of his headmaster. The man would can children for even the slightest fault, such as having a tie that wasn’t straight.

There is a problem with disruptive behaviour and violence in schools, but the solution isn’t corporal punishment. There’s a lot of pressure on schoolchildren already, with the requirement to do well at their sats and the other tests, which successive governments have seen fit to burden them. But apart from teaching them to pass exams, the goal of education should be to develop their talents. Stephen Fry attacking the Tories’ education policies under Maggie or John Major cited the Latin root of the word e-ducere: to lead out. The aim of education should be to lead out and develop the child and his or her talents and interests. Every good teacher not only wants to teach their subject, but to see their pupils actively enjoy it.

Corporal punishment and the vicious, sadistic discipline inflicted on past generations of children doesn’t do this. It has made too many children hate school, and the teachers and institutions that inflicted it. Bill Etheridge is simply wrong. On the other hand, if you want a new generation of beaten, brutalised, twitching and resentful ex-school kids, then he’s clearly the man for the job.