Posts Tagged ‘Sarfraz Manzoor’

Radio 2 Programme on Indian Soldiers in WW I

November 5, 2014

Earlier this week I reblogged a piece from Guy Debord’s Cat on the way the Nazi right were trying to cash in on Remembrance Day. They were selling poppies and merchandise with the intention of appropriating this act of commemoration for the fallen as a unique symbol of White British patriotism. In my own comment to the Cat’s eloquent piece, I pointed out that the British imperial forces not only included Whites, but also non-White servicemen and women. They also included Chinese labourers. These served with honour alongside their White comrades, but it is sadly only in the last decade or so that their contribution to the War has received the recognition it deserves. In the early part of this century the former Empire and Commonwealth Museum in Bristol staged an exhibition on non-White servicemen in the First World War. Radio 4 has also broadcast a programme about the Chinese labour force, whose own role in the conflict has really on just been recently rediscovered. Dominiek Dendooven, of the In Flanders Fields Museum in Ypres, Belgium, also gave a presentation in a seminar the archaeology department of Bristol University some years ago on ‘Multicultural War in Flanders’. This covered the material remains of the non-White troopers and labourers, and the trench art they produced during and after this most terrible of wars.

This Saturday, the 8th November, Radio 2 is also broadcasting a programme at 9 pm on the Indian squaddies in the conflict, Forgotten Heroes: the Indian Army in the Great War. The blurb for this in the Radio Times reads:

Sarfraz Manzoor tells the story of the 1.27 million men from the Indian Army who fought alongside British troops in every major battle from Ypres to Gallipolli – a fact almost completely overlooked in the history books. On the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, Manzoor redresses the balance, revealed through letters written home by sepoys – an expression for infantry soldier from the Perian/Urdu word – which were saved by military censors.