Posts Tagged ‘Peter Niggl’

GEHEIM on Mossad anti-Libyan Activities in West Germany

May 5, 2016

Lobster 15 also carried a review of GEHEIM, a West German magazine devoted to the dirty tricks of the western intelligences in Germany that had been coming out since 1983, by David Teacher. Along with articles on the Federal Republic’s own spy services and undercover police, the magazine also had articles on the CIA and the other American spy agencies, as well as our own, British intelligence agents, GEHEIM had an article by Peter Niggl on Mossad operations against Libya in the Bundesrepublik. Teacher wrote

Perhaps the most interesting article is “Gunning for Libya – anti-Libyan operations in West Berlin” by Peter Niggl. Niggl investigates Mossad involvement in assassinations of Libyan officials and in operations designed to ensure that terrorism remains on the front page of the Western media, thus souring Arab-European relations. He refers specifically to operations aimed at incriminating Syria and Libya in terrorist activities, such as the case of Hassan el Harti, a Palestinian and Mossad agent provocateur, who was arrested in 1979, with six accomplices, on bomb charges, then allowed bail and given back his passport.

The article describes a trio of shady individuals involved in anti-Libyan operations: Rageb M. Zatout, a Libyan exile and member of the Libyan National Salvation Army; Hilmar Hein, a German scaffolding contractor with links to the underworld and who claims to have met John Poindexter and Colonel Oliver North in Bangkok in 1983; and Moshe Ben Ari an Israeli alleged to be head of the ‘Third Eye of Zion’, a group which carries out Mossad’s dirty work in West Berlin. Niggl recounts in considerable detail (passport numbers, car number plates, telephone conversations, extracts from British and German police reports) how, between them, Zatout, Hein and Ben Ari organized the assassination of Libyan officials in London, Rome and Vienna; planned the assassination of Gadhafi in the attack on his Tripoli barracks on May 1984; and had a hand in the shooting of WPC Yvonne Fletcher in April ’84 in London.

Niggl also sees the Nesar Hindawi case as a Mossad operation designed to disrupt Syria’s relations with Europe. He points out that Nindawi’s father, a long-time employee of the Jordanian Embassy in London, was sentenced to death in absentia by Jordanians for being a Mossad agent, and that Nesar’s brother Hasi, arrested after the Berlin nightclub bombing that served to justify the American bombing of Libya, underwent a sudden change of heart about making a statement after receiving a prison visit from two Arab-speaking ‘Englishmen’, accompanied by German security official Norbert Boer. This statement came at the time when the Western media were at the peak of their campaign to portray Syria as the sponsor of world terrorism. It is perhaps significant that his trial Hasi did not stick to his previous declarations and states that one of the ‘Englishmen’ had presented himself in Arabic as an Egyptian, and could have been from Israel. Peter Niggl has opened up the subject: it is certainly worth further investigation. (Pp. 28-9).

This raises the question of how far the attempts to overthrow Assad in Syria are part of a long-term Israeli espionage policy, and whether there was Israeli involvement in the overthrow and death of Colonel Gaddafy.