Posts Tagged ‘Lynton Crosby’

Vox Political Invents the Theresa May Drinking Game

April 29, 2017

Mike has also made a few acute observations about Theresa May’s complete inability to articulate any clear vision for Britain, except to parrot the words ‘strong and stable’ at every opportunity instead of giving a clear answer.

Well, I suppose we shouldn’t expect anything more from the woman. When asked about Brexit, she just mindlessly repeated the formula ‘Brexit means Brexit’ like a scratched record, all while glaring at the crowd as if they were morons even to ask her such as basic question. She’s got no answers and is incapable of saying anything unless it’s previously been programmed into her by Lynton Crosby back at Tory Central Office.

So Mike’s decided to have a bit of fun with it. He’s invented a new drinking game. You take a bottle of something nice – it doesn’t have to be booze. Abstainers can enjoy it with a soft drink or a cordial. And then every time May repeats the word ‘strong’ or ‘stable’ you take a slug. If you haven’t had a ‘lavatorial accident’ by the end of the footage, then somebody’s edited the clip.

http://voxpoliticalonline.com/2017/04/27/lets-play-the-theresa-may-general-election-drinking-game/

Clearly, if you that every time she appears on TV or in the media, it won’t be long before you’re in that state frequently enjoyed by the late, great Oliver Reed. Which is possibly the only way many people are able to stand her.

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Vox Political: Tories Run from Welfare Debate with Labour

April 26, 2015

Mike over at Vox Political posted this piece on Tudesday commenting on the Tories’ latest attempts to pull out or alter the format and content of the Leader debates as soon as they look like they’re going to be potentially embarrassing. The article’s entitled Tories run from welfare debate after Cameron’s Marr Show disaster, as it discusses the way Cameron was due to debate Ed Miliband about welfare policy. In the event, he didn’t, and pulled out. This came after he was humiliated on the Andrew Marr when he was asked if he understood the terrible suffering his welfare cuts were causing ordinary people.

Marr specifically raised the case of David Clapson, a diabetic former soldier, who died after his benefit was sanctioned. This left him unable to afford food, or pay for the insulin he needed.

Cameron hummed and ha-ed a bit, as he usually does when faced with a question he doesn’t like, and for which he doesn’t have answer specially prepared by Lynton Crosby or the other policy wonks at Tory Central Office. He claimed that the benefit cuts had seen people get back into work. They haven’t – see Johnny Void effective demolition of this claim over at his blog, as well as Mike’s own pieces on this. Then he made the devastating admission.

He thought it was entire right that people should suffer such deprivation, if they did not comply with the DWP’s demands.

He is damned by his own words: he has absolutely no concern or sympathy for the tens of thousands of lives that have been destroyed by his policies. Of his attitude towards David Clapson’s particular case, Mike comments

Cameron’s responses indicate that he seems to think it was right for Mr Clapson to die as punishment for missing a single Job Centre appointment (for reasons that have not been disclosed). He refused to accept that the system should be reviewed.

Cameron clearly felt deeply humiliated by the interview. The Mirror reported that Cameron and his cronies stormed off without going back to the green room afterwards to chat with the other guests. As for his demeanour when Paxo had asked him a similar, difficult question, Private Eye stated that it left him in ‘silent, puce fury’, as though his fag had dared to cheek him back.

And so Cameron decided that he was definitely not going to face Miliband in a debate about welfare policy. Mike comments that it shows the Tories for what they are: bullies. And

Like all bullies, they like to torture the weak. When public opinion rises up against them and they have a choice between “fight” and “flight”, they run like rabbits.

Mike’s article is at http://voxpoliticalonline.com/2015/04/21/tories-run-from-welfare-debate-after-camerons-marr-show-disaster/. Go there and read it for yourself.

Mike’s article also has the highly relevant memes. This one below is specifically about David Clapson.

Clapson Meme

The other is on how Cameron plans to cut all social security spending, leaving the poor and sick to fend for themselves.

Cameron Welfare

Anti-Tory Memes

April 14, 2015

These memes were all posted by some of the commenters over at Johnny Void’s blog, where he put up the figures released last week showing the complete and utter failure of IDS’ welfare reforms.

These memes show the reality of the Tories’ welfare policies: suffering, homeless and death, all to save their rich donors money and provide a cringing, fearful labour force.

IDS Death Meme

The one below shows IDS’ absolute hypocrisy, in talking about the terrible atrocities at Auschwitz and then importing its slogan to justify his own workfare policies. Policies which are also based on forced labour, and in which the sanctions that form a vital part of the control mechanism have also resulted in deaths.

Not that IDS is alone in using Auschwitz’ notorious motto. One of the Tories writing in one of the national newspapers also began his piece with the statement that although the slogan had become notorious because of its use by the extermination camp, it was nevertheless still valid and true. That section of the article ended up disappearing, as even Lynton Crosby or someone very like him realised how outrageous it was. It’s a pity the writer didn’t before he put his fingers to the keyboard, or IDS before he opened his mouth.

IDS Auschwitz Meme

And then there’s this piece, which I think Mike has put up already on Vox Political, with a hat-tip to Mr Void. This also shows the twisted morality of the Tory party when they try to justify their policies of attacking the poor and defenceless, while claiming that somehow they’re helping them.

Cameron Sanctions Homeless Meme

In the coming weeks Cameron and the other Tories are going to be doing their level best to lie to the public, telling them how caring they are, and that their welfare reforms aren’t really sadistically cruel and futile at all. Cameron has already been in the Independent trying to tell the voting public that he’s really a ‘compassionate Conservative’. Well, if he’s a compassionate one, I’d hate to see what the really nasty specimens are like. Although I’ve got a good idea looking at IDS, Peter Lilley, Osborne and the entire membership of UKIP.

So let’s use these memes to remind people of the reality.

A Lesson from Weimar Germany: Gustav Stresemann, Company Directors as Politicians and the State Funding of Political Parties

August 5, 2013

While the Conservatives have attacked the Labour Party for its links to the trade unions, they themselves have profound links to big business and have consistently acted in the interests of the corporations that fund them and of which many of their MPs are directors. My brother, Mike, Another Angry Voice , Street Democracy, and numerous other bloggers have noted that the Conservative MPs, like Ian Duncan Smith, proposing the dismantlement of the welfare state and the NHS have connections to companies seeking to profit from this. Their spin doctor, Lynton Crosbie, is in the pay of the tobacco companies, hence Cameron’s decision not to pass laws requiring the sale of cigarettes in plain white packaging. See http://mikesivier.wordpress.com/2013/07/29/cameron-corrupt-corporate-whore-according-to-meacher/, https://beastrabban.wordpress.com/2013/07/28/the-discreet-charm-of-lord-coe/, http://mikesivier.wordpress.com/2013/07/24/lies-lobbying-lynton-and-a-last-insult-before-the-long-summer-break/, http://streetdemocracy.wordpress.com/2013/07/19/social-services-for-vulnerable-children-in-england-to-be-privatised/, http://anotherangryvoice.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/lazy-lord-coe-and-tory-nhs-reforms.html, http://anotherangryvoice.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/lynton-crosby-conflicts-of-interest-tory.html, http://anotherangryvoice.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/tory-donations-peerages-contracts.html, for example. Going further back in time, Private Eye in the latter Thatcher administration and Major era printed the number of Tory MPs with connections to the alcohol industry, when those administrations introduced 24-hour drinking and rebuffed calls for greater legislation regarding its sale and advertisement.Recently there have also been called for state funding for political parties, following the fall in their funding as they have lost members. These issues are, however, very definitely not unique to early twenty-first century Britain. Concerns over the politicians’ connections to industry and suggestions that this should be replaced by state funding were first raised nearly ninety years ago by the German statesman, Gustav Stresemann.

Stresemann was the leader of the Deutsche Volkspartei, DVP, or ‘German People’s Party’.This was the successor to the National Liberals of pre-WWI Germany. Anti-socialist with the slogan ‘From red chains make yourselves free/ Only the German People’s Party’, it was the party of business and academia. Its party councils attracted leading businessmen, and industrialists such as Stinnes, Vogler and Kalle served as DVP deputies in the Reichstag. In 1930 ten of the Party’s deputies in the Reichstag between them were directors of 77 companies. This troubled Stresemann, who wished the party to develop a more genuinely Liberal, disinterested approach to politics. In 1928 he and his colleague, Julius Curtius, received complaints from other members of the party when the joined the cabinet of the new Reichschancellor, Hermann Muller, a member of the SPD, the German socialist party. Stresemann countered that the 23 members of the parliamentary party were connected with big business, and did not have the courage ‘to take a position contrary to that of the big employers’ groups and industrial associations’. Stresemann began to consider that the only way to prevent such undue industrial influence in the Party should be by limiting the donations from industry and establishing a system of state funding for the parties. Unfortunately, the catastrophic economic collapse of 1929 and the foreign policy crises of the late 20s and 30s prevented him from doing anything about this. Nevertheless, it is significant that he recognised this as a problem, and suggested that state funding should be used to oppose it.

Most people in Britain probably feel that politicians are already paid too much and too well rewarded, and their parties too corrupt, malicious or incompetent to deserve state funding. It is important to note that in all the calls for the state funding of political parties, no-one has called for limiting political donations. Instead state funding is seen as solution to a general lack of funds. I feel that the next there are calls for political parties to be subsidised by the state, it should be accompanied by legislation limiting the amount they can receive from industry, as suggested by Stresemann. Only then can we expect anything like a parliament free from such commercial interests.

David Cameron, Alan Clarke, the Conservatives and the Tobacco Lobby

July 23, 2013

David Cameron has been in the news the last few days for his attempts to block legislation requiring that cigarettes be sold in plain packages, as has been suggested in Australia. Central to this campaign is one of the Tories’ spin doctors, Lynton Crosby, who is part of the Crosby Textor Aussie lobbying firm that works for the tobacco industry.

Unfortunately, this is pretty much par for the course for the Conservatives, who have long running connections to the tobacco and alcohol industries. During Major’s administration his economics expert, Alan Clarke, took up a position with British American Tobacco. Private Eye, with their usual wit and bile, sent him up as BATMan, a parody of the superhero strip. This featured Clarke as BatMan, hurtling around in his BATmobile, shaped like a giant cigarette, combatting the evil forces of the anti-smoking lobby and forcing Third World children to take up smoking. He was rather like an overweight, middle-aged Nick O’tine, if you can remember that anti-smoking advert from all those years ago.

So, as with so many of the Tories’ policies, no change there then.