Posts Tagged ‘Joan Collins’

Farage Ready to Launch New Brexit Party?

February 5, 2019

Buried in the pages of the I last week – I’m afraid I can’t quite remember when – was the news that Nigel Farage, the quondam Fuehrer of UKIP, is preparing a new party ready to fight for a proper Brexit. Or rather, what he sees as a proper Brexit, which is properly going to be quite different from most normal people’s idea. Farage declared that people were disappointed in the government’s handling of Britain’s departure from the EU, and he had a new party almost ready to enter the next election to fight for something better. The new party had nearly 7 million pounds of funding as well as legions of candidates ready to field.

This piece of earth-shattering non-news was reported in a small article dwarfed by much bigger reports of the government’s and Labour’s actions and policies on the same and facing page. Which is probably why it doesn’t seem to have caused much sensation. I haven’t really been looking for any news about it, but I haven’t seen anyone else on the blogs I usually follow, including Mike, talking about this latest promise to revitalize British politics.

And I’m not surprised. We’ve been here before. Remember all those years ago round about 2004 when Robert Kilroy-Silk announced he was a launching a new party to campaign against foreign immigration and demand Britain leave the EU? Which I think had the backing of Joan Collins, now living in France. Kilroy caused immense anger with his bigoted remarks about foreigners in general, and specifically about Arabs and Muslims. This in turn gave the British public immense amusement when a couple of rightly offended Muslims poured ordure over him as he was filmed opening his mouth to spout xenophobic bilge and leading questions. For all the outrage and controversy Kilroy caused, his party went absolutely nowhere. It fizzled out, and vanished without a trace. The same is likely to happen very soon with UKIP, and is almost certain to happen with the Fuhrage’s new outfit, whatever the former Kipper generalissimo may say to the contrary.

Farage, one of his books was titled Flying Free, departed UKIP claiming that it was now too racist for him. But under Farage the party was hardly a haven of multicultural tolerance and gender equality. It contained more than its fair share of racists and former members of the Fascist right, as well as homophobes, Muslim-haters and anti-feminists, if not out-and-out misogynists. And there were claims that Farage himself was just as bigoted, going right back to the time he was a public schoolboy. Anti-racists, LGBTQ activists and feminists didn’t just protest his party, but also him. Like on one occasion when a group of the above, including Muslims and drag queens turned up at a pub in which he planned to have a lunch time pint and began protesting against him. Which included the Muslims praying to show that they were no threat to anyone and were the victims of his and his party’s prejudice. Farage’s party won’t be treated any differently, if it every launches. Which is a very good question.

UKIP was always a single issue party. It stood for Britain’s departure from the EU. Other policies, like the bigotry and racism were simply additions, although I’ve know doubt that to many Kippers they were fundamental reasons for their joining. But the fundamental issue at UKIP’s core, its very raison d’etre, was simply Brexit. And that was achieved, more or less, when the Leave campaign won. The referendum was called by the Tories, who were then re-elected as the governing party – unfortunately – and who then began the consequent botched negotiations and stupid, self-interested politicking that has produced the current mess. UKIP had been given what they primarily wanted, and were shut out of the whole process. As a result, they started to decline. Rapidly.

And it’s because they’re irrelevant that Kipperfuehrer Batten has now lurched even further, or just most obviously, to the far right. He’s taken on veteran islamophobe, former BNP member and jailbird Tommy Robinson as his advisor on Islam and prison reform, Tommy Robinson, and right-wing YouTube personalities Mark ‘Count Dankula’ Meechan and Carl ‘Sargon of Akkad’ Benjamin because he thinks they’ll bring in more members. The unnamed Kipper official, who tried to dissuade Benjamin from joining in the leaked audio recording told him that they wanted Robinson in, because he was likely to bring with him also several thousand of his followers, who would take the whole process of campaigning and leafleting seriously. Unlike, it has to be said, Sargon, who was personally uninterested in actively campaigning for the party except for the content on his blog, and whose followers showed how seriously they took real political activism by getting smashed in a pub and shouting ‘Free Kekistan!’ out the window at passing cars. Sargon, Dankula and Robinson are notorious bigots, and I’ve put up a video of one, non-racist Kipper railing angrily against their joining, who made it very clear that Batten had destroyed the party for him and he wanted to leave. And somehow I don’t think for a moment that he’s alone.

Batten undoubtedly is going to lose members. But before the Kipper leadership resorted to appealing to extremists, they tried a more moderate approach. A year or so ago they were also claiming that Brexit wasn’t being delivered properly, and issued their demands for their view of how it all ought to be done. And no-one was remotely interested. Hence, presumably, Fuehrer Batten’s decision to try recruiting people even more openly extreme than many of the existing members. It’s a desperate tactic to halt the party’s dwindling membership and prevent its decline into total irrelevance and obscurity.

And I predict the fate of Farage’s proposed new party will be absolutely no different. Always assuming it ever gets launched, of course.

And speaking of electoral irrelevance and obscurity, what happened to this new, shiny centrist party that Blair was backing and which was supposedly ready to launch? You know, the one that was supposed to have rich corporate donors, and which was ready to accept all the right-wing Blairite Labour MPs ready to defy Corbyn and depart en masse from the party? The exciting new party that was later revealed to have no real policies and a miniscule membership, which got even smaller before it was ever launched when one of its disgruntled founders picked up his ball and walked out. It was supposedly all set and ready to go early last year, if not before. But now it’s February 2019, and we’ve not heard a dicky bird from them since. Though the right-wing Labour MPs are muttering once again about departing. But not, apparently, to that new party, which seems to have died the death before it ever got going.

Pretty much as we can expect Farage’s party to do.

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Vox Political: DWP Charging Premium Rates for Helpline

February 20, 2016

More of the sheer malice the Tories have towards the poor and needy. Mike has this report from the Independent on the way the DWP is continuing to charge premium rates of 45p per minute for mobiles, 12p per minute for landlines, on its helplines. With the long delays claimants can suffer when trying to telephone the Department for help, this means that, according to the head of the foodbank charity, the Trussell Trust, David McAuley, many claimants will be forced with a stark choice between eating and sorting out their claim. See http://voxpoliticalonline.com/2016/02/19/how-much-dwps-helpline-will-break-the-bank-for-benefit-claimants/.

One of Mike’s comments, Spamlet, has pointed out that this violates equalities legislation as many claimants are disabled. He also has personal experience of being hit with an enormous phone bill for an afternoon’s call to the DWP. He writes

Under the Equality Act, the DWP is required to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ not to discriminate against disabled people. A large proportion of those forced to use this service will be disabled people. It is not reasonable to force them to use food money waiting for hours in the hope that they might eventually get through! I once had a £17 phone bill for one afternoon calling help lines, just trying to find the right person to complain to about lack of service.

This is more of the ‘less elibility’ Maggie hailed as one of her ‘Victorian virtues’: you make welfare and poor relief so tough that it deters all but the most desperate to take it. Mind you, the Tories aren’t the only people, who’ve done this trick with expensive phone lines. In the 1990s, the permatanned talk show, Robert Kilroy-Silk got into Private Eye for the exorbitant rates calls to his programmes charged when they decided to make an edition on homelessness. The Eye reasonably thundered against this, asking rhetorically home many homeless people could afford the charge. Now the Tories are trying the same stunt. It could even be cooked up by the same people, given the way BBC news personnel seem to shunt back and forth between the Conservative party and our supposedly impartial broadcaster.

Silk vanished from the public eye after becoming involved with anti-European Union, anti-immigrant politics. He first joined UKIP, then left and formed Veritas with Joan Collins. His career finally imploded after he went on a long rant against the Arabs in his newspaper column. One of the least offensive things he said there was that they hadn’t done anything constructive since the 12th century. This was about the same time the public was treated to the spectacle of him campaigning for UKIP. He was shown on live television asking a Frenchman working in this country why he didn’t go home tomorrow, and have ordure poured over him by Muslims. This was one violent attack in Britain by members of that faith that people of all faiths and none supported as a moral act.

Silk, fortunately, is gone, but less happily the Tories remain.

SF Author Bob Shaw and Comics Artist Bryan Talbot on Granada TV 1981

May 11, 2015

I found these two videos featuring the great Science Fiction author Bob Shaw and the comics artist and creator, Bryan Talbot. They’re actually two halves of Granada’s literature programme, Celebrations, broadcast in 1981. The show consists of interviews with Shaw and Talbot discussing their career and work, and then a very short play specially written for the programme By Shaw, and illustrated by Talbot. In between sequences of the play, the actors discuss it and the issues it raises.

The producers clearly didn’t have any money for any special effects whatsoever, only for the costumes and period props used by the actors. Hence the illustrations by Talbot, which stand in for live action effects sequences.

Shaw was an Ulsterman with a background in aeronautical engineering. He describes how his studying at school to go to university was ruined by his discovery of Science Fiction in the form of the American pulp magazines. He states it was as mind-blowing as an LSD trip, with the exception that LSD wears off. And so instead of studying properly at school and paying attention, he was at the back of the class writing his own SF fanzine on carbon paper.

For those too young to know what that is, it’s the mucky stuff we had to use before the invention of computer printers and widespread access to photocopiers. It’s a form of the process you can make transfers and copies by rubbing a pencil over one side of a sheet of paper, pressing it down on another and then drawing on the other side of the first sheet so that the design comes out on the second. It was messy, and if you didn’t watch out, your hands, clothes and anything else in contact with the stuff was left black.

Shaw states that Science Fiction is only the genre that still isn’t accepted as proper literature. It’s sneered at, and when literary writers use it, somehow their work isn’t Science Fiction, but ‘literature’. He gives Orwell’s 1984 as an example. It’s clearly Science Fiction, but not considered as such because of its status as a work of proper literature.

This dates the programme, as the attitude has changed somewhat. The SF author Simon D. Ings had his own column in New Scientist back in the 1990s. I read one of the latest books by M. John Harrison, the author of the Viriconium novels, now regarded as SF/ Fantasy classics, after it was given a good review in the I. Nevertheless, Shaw’s comments on the low status of Science Fiction as literature do retain some truth. Again, back in the 1990s I remember when the literary novel, GUT Symmetries, came out to high literary acclaim. It took its name from the Grand Unified Theory physicists and cosmologists like Stephen Hawking are seeking, which will unify Quantum physics with the normal, relativistic physics of the ‘macro’ world. The plot involved parallel universes. Looking at the brief descriptions in the literary columns, I was struck by how much it resembled other works of genre Science Fiction, particularly that of Lisa Tuttle. Yet Tuttle and the other SF authors exploring similar themes weren’t mentioned.

There was much discussion in the SF fanzines at the time about the way non-genre, respectable literary authors were appropriating themes from Science Fiction. They were applauded by the literary crowd for their ground-breaking new work, while SF was still despised and confined in a kind of literary ghetto. The late Terry Pratchett, speaking one year at the Cheltenham Literary Festival, described how the organisers of the Festival looked at him as if we he was going to give a lecture about mending motorcycles. Despite the eminence, popularity and literary skill shown by Pratchett, he and the genre he wrote in still weren’t quite acceptable in respectable literary company. As well as a very funny writer, Pratchett was a funny and witty speaker, and the fans crowding the room loved it.

Shaw also speaks about how he attempts to ground his SF in scientific reality, but states that nothing dates faster than today’s science. The example he gives is of an episode of the old Flash Gordon film serial, then being shown on British TV. There’s one episode where Flash and Dale Arden have to abandon a stricken spaceship falling out of the sky. As they are about to bail out, Flash shouts out that they must check that they’ve got their anti-gravity belts and ray guns. They do so, and these look suitably futuristic. Then Dale remembers that they’ve forgotten the portable radio. Radios at the time were things the size of small tables, and so when she returns, she’s got something of that size strapped to her back. The writer knew what size portable radios were, but couldn’t imagine them being any smaller. And so his failure of the imagination, his inability to see that one day radios would shrink to a more manageable size, dates the whole show.

As for Bryan Talbot, the show mentions that he began his career as a comics illustrator in the underground commix of the drug counterculture. It shows some of the work he did for the Luther Arkwright comics series. This was set in a multiverse of parallel worlds, and was strongly influenced by the novels of Michael Moorcock.

The play itself, ‘Encounter with a Madman’, is about a time traveller from a sterile and dying Britain, poisoned by chemical and nuclear waste, travelling back to the early 19th century to meet Dalton, the discoverer of the atom. She explains to Dalton that, through his discovery, he will ultimately be responsible for the ‘ecodeath’ that has destroyed Britain and is slowly leading its last survivors to extinction. Dalton himself is torn, unable to decide whether the visitor is a madman, uttering blasphemous nonsense, or just might be telling the truth, no matter how bizarre that is. The gamekeeper, however, shoots her in the belief that she’s a French spy. She arrives back in the poisoned wasteland of nearly two centuries into the future, and dies, clutching a single flower.

Shaw and Talbot aren’t the only famous faces on the programme, as the traveller herself is played by a very young Jenny Éclair, now one of Britain’s top comediennes.

Unfortunately, as the programme was shown on ITV, the videos also contain some of the adverts. They’re mostly instantly forgettable, though they do contain one of the Cinzano Bianco adverts with Leonard Rossiter and Joan Collins. They’re now held as comedy classics in their own right. They weren’t much good as adverts, however, as everyone remembered how funny Rossiter and Collins were, and completely forgot what the product was.

Here’s part 1:

And part 2:

I’ve got an idea I read in an interview somewhere that Shaw left Northern Ireland for Britain. He said he did so because in Ireland, you got everything, including books, from the local corner shop. He was just about one of the very few readers of Science Fiction in Ireland at the time, and was sick of people looking at him and asking, ‘What are you reading that rubbish for?’ when he went to pick up the latest SF paperback or mag.