Posts Tagged ‘Imams Online’

The Origin of the Fear of a Muslim Holocaust in Nazi Propaganda

January 12, 2016

Yesterday I put up a piece about Paul Berman’s book, The Flight of the Intellectuals, which argues that the modern Islamist movements – al-Qaeda, but also Hamas, and the Islamic Republic of the Ayatollah Khomeini, ultimately have their origins in the writings of Hassan al-Banna and the Muslim Brotherhood. The book also describes the role of the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj al-Husseini, in translating Nazi anti-Semitic propaganda into the Muslim and Arab worlds. Al-Husseini claimed, despite the evidence of the very limited dimensions of the Jewish state at the time, that the Jews were planning to wipe out Islam and the Arabs, and to turn all the Arab countries in the Middle East into homelands for themselves and Black Americans. He therefore urged, and organised, a genocidal war against Jews, commanding his audience to kill the Jews and their children before the Jews killed them.

It’s vile, poisonous stuff from someone, who played an enthusiastic part in the Holocaust of European Jews, as well as massacres of those in Palestine. His fear-mongering of a Jewish superstate goes far beyond the Nakba, or ‘disaster, catastrophe’, the term Palestinians have given to the eradication of their communities and their displacement at the establishment of Israe. Looking through al-Husseini’s rhetoric also makes sense of the claims of a similar genocide made by one British Muslim firebrand in the 1990s.

This was Kalim Saddiqui, who was one of the Muslim leaders involved in stirring up hatred against Salman Rushdie over the Satanic Verses. In the early 1990s the Beeb screened a documentary on the problems afflicting the Islamic community in Britain. These problems included poor academic performance, unemployment and the consequent feelings of disenfranchisement and alienation. They filmed Siddiqui preaching in his mosque. He told the assembled worshippers that ‘British society is a gigantic killing machine, and killing Muslims comes very easily to them.’ I’m aware of the racism and violence many Muslims have to face, not least from the Stormtroopers of the Far Right, like the BNP, and their successors, the English Defence League. But this went far beyond a complaint about racism to a bigoted, racist statement about non-Muslims Brits.

To their credit, the Beeb tried to tackle Siddiqui about this. His response was that it was part of his defence of Islam against the forces, of which Rushdie’s book was a part. He then claimed that the Satanic Verses was simply part of a ‘Holocaust of Muslims’ that was being prepared. It’s rubbish, of course, but such fears do now unfortunately have a certain verisimilitude now that Trump is demanding a halt to Muslim immigration, and the registration of those already in America. Against this, it needs to be noted that there are other Americans on the streets, including not just Muslim Americans, but also members of the traditional White and Black communities and Jews demonstrating against Trump’s poison. Several Jewish organisations were so horrified by Trump’s plans, which were so close to what they experienced during the Third Reich, that they organised demonstrations against the tousle-haired Nazi in 17 cities across the US. Siddiqui also made the comments at the time of the Bosnian War, when the Serbs were committing massacres against Bosnian Muslims. That might partly explain Siddiqui’s vile rant.

But mostly it seems to me now that Siddiqui had absorbed the conspiracy theories and the rhetoric of genocide against Muslims shoved out by the Grand Mufti as part of his pro-Nazi campaign. In which case, the roots of Islamism and Islamist terrorism in Britain go back at least two decades. Siddiqui and the other preachers of hate prepared a paranoid, intensely hostile mindset within the audiences, which may have made some susceptible to the teachings and propaganda of al-Qaeda and now ISIS later on.

Siddiqui and his fellows, like Anjem Chaudhury, do not represent all Muslims in Britain by any means. They’re extremely controversial, and there have been demonstrations against them as bigots, who pervert the message of Islam, by liberal Muslims. There are a number of books and Muslim organisations, like Imams Online, which exist to tackle the Islamism and hate they promote. If you go over to the anti-racist organisation’s Hope Not Hate site, there are also numerous articles on events that have been organised around the country to bring Muslims and non-Muslims together, with pictures of Muslim imams talking and laughing with Christian vicars, and members of the other faiths. Siddiqui’s rhetoric is part of the Nazi distortion of Islam, and doesn’t represent the whole of the ‘umma or its history.

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The Young Turks on French Journalist’s Statement on ISIS and Bombing of Syria

December 5, 2015

Okay, this is yet another video from the left-wing American news show, The Young Turks. Here the Turks’ main anchor, Cenk Uygur, talks about Nicholas Henin, the French journalist, who was held captive by the mad butchers for over a year. He saw Mohamed ‘Jihadi John’ Emwazi murder six of his friends for their wretched propaganda videos, and still wonders about how many Syrians were butchered by him and who cares for them?

I blogged about this video yesterday, when it was included by Tom Pride of Pride’s Purge in an excellent piece he had written about not bombing Syria. Henin states that bombing won’t work, as it will only lead to further radicalisation. ISIS want to alienate Muslims and create division between them and the West, so that they can win them over by posing as the religion’s true defenders. In stark opposition to their dreams of creating hatred for the West amongst Muslims is the mass exodus of Syrian refugees to the West. It’s a slap in their face to their claim that they have created an Islamic ‘dreamland’, and they are mightily dismayed when the refugees are welcomed, rather than received with hatred.

Henin also states that they see the world through an ancient prophecy that states that Muslims will fight a battle against an army of 80 nations. I commented yesterday that this appears to be an Islamic belief about the end of the world. It’s similar to the Christian belief about the Battle of Armageddon, in which Christians will fight a battle against the forces of the Anti-Christ. Henin believes that this is the reason why ISIS is attacking so many countries, such as America, France and so on. They are hoping to create this army of 80 infidel nations, in order to fulfil the prophecy, or their interpretation of it.

Here’s the video.

Uygur adds a few more pieces of information about ISIS’ millennialist beliefs. He states that Sunnis believe in one version of the prophecy, Shi’ah another, and that many Muslims don’t believe in it at all. He points out that what’s important is that ISIS do believe in a poisonous version of it, and are acting to fulfil this interpretation. And so, he warns, we should be careful to avoid falling into their trap and doing exactly what they want us to do.

Like bomb Syria.

My guess is that ISIS are deliberately fighting for control over Syria as part of their end of the world beliefs, and not just because they see it as an important part of their projected caliphate. One of the Muslim prophecies about the end of the world concerns the rise of an anti-Christ, al-Dajjal, who will lead the Muslim community away from true belief and attack the remaining true believers. Muslims believe he will be killed by Christ Himself. Before Christ does, the Muslims will seek refuge at Jabal al-Dukhan in Syria, where they will be besieged by al-Dajjal and his forces of evil. (See IBN Kathir, The Signs Before the Day of Judgement (London: Dar Al Taqwa 1991), p. 52). I think the West and its allies would be extremely wise to consider how any military action they might pursue in Syria may be perceived and twisted to seem as a fulfilment of the ancient prophecies.

Hope Not Hate, the anti-racist, anti-religious extremism organisation, reported a new initiative by moderate Islamic scholars to combat the teachings of extremists like ISIS, al-Qaeda and the other Islamist groups. This is Imams On Line. If any Muslim has encountered Islamist propaganda, and is worried about it, they can go there to see it authoritatively refuted by mainstream Islamic scholarship.

Imams Online Launch Internet Campaign against ISIS Propaganda

March 30, 2015

Hope Not Hate also have this story, Imams To ‘Reclaim Internet’ From Extremists, reporting that their partners in combating religious extremism, Imams Online, have launched a new site to combat terrorist propaganda from groups like ISIS and al-Qaeda. It’s an online magazine called Haqiqah, or ‘The Reality’, which aims to provide clear expositions of the pieces of Islamic scripture quoted by the terrorists and extremists to promote their vile views. The magazine quotes Shaukat Warraich, Imams Online’s chief editor, as saying

“We’re turning the tide. Though we still have a way to go, we know that by taking efforts to support and mobilise the huge online Muslim population, we will eventually drown out the violent voices.”

The article also states that it joins the sites #NotInMyName from the Active Change Foundation and Inspire’s #MakingAStand. It concludes by urging everyone to support British Muslims in driving out the pedlars of hate.

The article’s at http://www.hopenothate.org.uk/blog/nick/imams-to-reclaim-internet-from-extremists-4348. Go and read it for further information and links to the sites.

See It Report It Site for Reporting On-Line Racism and Extremism

December 17, 2014

The anti-racist and anti-extremist site, Hope Not Hate, along with the Active Change Foundation, Imams Online and Upstanding Neighbourhoods, have helped launch a new site to enable people to report racism, hatred and violent extremism on-line. This is See It Report It, which has a line of separate functions to allow people to report any racist or extremist material on Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, Instagram, Vimeo, Daily Motion, Liveleak, Vine, Pinterest, Tumblr, Google+ and Ask FM quickly and easily. The site’s at http://www.seeitreportit.org/.

I mention this, because of the way the violent Islamist terrorists have used the Net to justify, recruit and glorify their vicious and brutal atrocities and White racists such as Britain First are using it to spread their own vile hatred. A number of bloggers a week or so ago acted to report a piece posted on Youtube, A Message to David Cameron, in which the speaker made it very clear that so great was his hatred for Muslims, that he wanted to go down to the south coast and shoot Muslim immigrants as they came ashore.

We need to be very aware of the dangers of on-line racial and religious hatred. It’s very good indeed that, in addition to the existing mechanism for reporting it, this new site has been launched.