Posts Tagged ‘‘House of Cards’’

The Young Turks on the Dwindling Audience for Cable News

February 14, 2016

This is a very interesting piece pointing to the future of the news media from The Young Turks’ anchor, John Iadarola. Iadarola states that the Turks are always warning their audience to be wary of cable news because of its bias: its support for whoever happens to be in power at the time, its defence of powerful corporate interests and the establishment. But it seems that there may not be anything to worry about for much longer, according to figures about where the different generations in American society get their news.

In a poll inquiring where Americans were getting the news of the present presidential election campaign, amongst 18 to 29 year olds, 35% said they got their news from social media. 18% said they got it from news websites and apps, 12% from cable news, 11% from radio and 10% from local TV.

Adults over 30 primarily relied on cable news, and for adults 50 and older, the proportion getting their news from cable was 43%; network nightly news 17% and local TV 10%. Collectively, cable TV has 24% of the total audience across the generations for news.

To Iadarola, however, the message behind these figures is very clear. While cable TV is the news source of choice for more mature viewers, its influence with the young is waning. These are the people, who are still forming their political opinions, and they are going to vote in more elections than the over 65s. The future’s with the internet, in other words, not cable, despite cables massive budgets, traditional dominance of the media, and ability to get the presidential candidates on air.

While this clearly is about Americans’ viewing habits, it has profound implications for British television and news media as well. More and more people on this side of the Atlantic are turning to the Net for their news, with the result that newspapers have massively declining readerships. On Friday the Independent announced that it would cease printing, and its sister publication, the I, was to be sold off. The Guardian is similarly losing about £45 million every year, and the Torygraph is also in trouble. In its case, this has much to do with its ‘doddery’ chief executive, Murdoch McLellan, not understanding the way the internet works, and appointing advisors who know even less, as well as its craven grovelling towards its advertisers, as commanded by the weirdo Barclay Twins. It also shot itself in the foot by ordering its readers to go out and join the Labour party to get Corbyn elected for the benefit of the Tories.

Not even the Times is immune. The paper’s also losing money hand over fist, and it’s been said that the time is long gone when it would have been axed in the normal course of events. It hasn’t, because it is supposed to be the paper of record, and its ownership gives Rupert Murdoch a place at the political table with the premier and other leading politicians.

Television is also feeling the bite from the Internet, with the Beeb also looking worried about competition from cyberspace. So much so that one article in the Radio Times mooted abandoning the policy of impartiality to produce biased news like Fox, which at least has an audience. This piece shows that Fox does indeed have an audience, but possibly not for much longer. Somebody did a poll of the average age of Fox viewers. Their average ago is 69. Somebody jocularly called them an on-line retirement community.

Satellite and cable TV in Britain now has a much larger audience than it did previously, and people are turning to the internet to watch blockbusting series like House of Cards or Game of Thrones. But my guess is that in Britain, at least, the main TV channels are just about managing to hold their own. Just about.

This means that I suspect that there will be increased interest by American broadcasters to buy into British TV. Channel 5 has been bought up by the Americans, and Rupert Murdoch would desperately, desperately like the Beeb privatised so his empire of filth can move in. (I say that, but actually I like the X Files, so I’ll make an exception for Mulder and Scully). Expert even more demands from the Murdoch press for the Beeb to be sold off in the coming months and years. Murdoch and the other cable barons have got their backs to the wall, and the internet is coming up to bite them.