Posts Tagged ‘Gloria Steinem’

Clintonite Democrats Angry Because Bernie Sanders Invited to Speak at Forthcoming Women’s March

October 15, 2017

In the video below, Jimmy Dore, Steffi Zamorano, Ron Placone and Dave Riemitz comment on the Clintonite Democrats’ anger that Bernie Sanders has been invited to appear as the guest speaker on the opening night of a new Women’s March planned for the end of October. This follows the previous Women’s March against the election of Donald Trump. Dore himself states that the original lacked a focus, and so it became a protest against nothing in particular. He isn’t against it. He just thinks that it could be done better.

Dore notes that the march’s organisers, or at least very many of them, are women of colour, a fact which serves to refute some of the objections made by the Corporate Dems, and show up their own racial prejudices in turn. The veteran feminist, Gloria Steinem, made Sanders an honorary woman for the event, which, remarks Dore, should make his appearance OK. But Neera Tanden, one of the Clintonite Dems, objected on the grounds of Sanders’ gender, asking if no women could be found to open the event. To which Tamika D. Mallory, one of the Black ladies organising it, responded by saying that there were going to be sixty speakers, or whom only two were male. Stephanie Schriock, the head of Emily’s List, also complains about Sanders’ speaking at the event. Dore then shows what a hypocrite she is with a piece from about a year or two ago, in which Emily’s List invited Bill Clinton to speak at their gala dinner about the need for female leadership in 2016. Cue more crude and bawdy jokes about what precisely Bill meant for female leadership. Clearly, the Clintonite Dems don’t have a problem with men speaking at feminist events. They just have a problem with Bernie Sanders speaking. As for their complaint about having Bernie as their main male speaker, Mallory points out that Sanders isn’t. Their main, headline speaker is another woman of colour, Maxine Waters, and states she finds it strange that her presence at the event is overlooked by the Clintonites, who focus on that of a White man. And Nomiki Konst, one of The Young Turks reporters, in reply to the moaning from Schriock, states that Emily’s List is an institution that has been criticising for giving their financial backing to wealthy women, while raising money from young women and women of colour. Another commenter, Katie Halper, asks her audience to imagine what it would be like if neoliberal feminists were as offended by poverty as they are by Sanders speaking at the event.

And the final piece that blows their complaints out of the water is the fact that Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, and two other ladies were also asked to attend, but turned it down.

Dore ends the video by stating that Clinton and her cronies are the type of people the Democrats need to get rid of. They should leave and join the Republicans. The Democrat party should be taken over by the Progressives, or it will die. And it’s pretty much dead already. But America’s most popular politician is still treated abysmally by the Democrats. Dore’s last comment is a joke that he expects Rachel Maddow, a very establishment Democrat broadcaster, will cover this.

I’ve put this up because Killary was in Cheltenham today at the Literary Festival, trying to sell her book to the British reading public. Well, Dore remarks in the video that perhaps Clinton turned down her invitation to appear at the women’s march as she couldn’t sell her book. The Women’s March in America was accompanied by similar women’s marches in other countries across the globe, including ours. And just as the Clintonites tried to smear Sanders’ supporters as a misogynist, so the Blairites in the Labour party tried to smear Corbyn and his supporters.

As for Hillary herself, she’s a corrupt corporatist, who represents only extremely rich, entitled women like herself. The neoliberal policies she and her husband have championed have caused nothing but poverty in America and abroad. She’s also a hawkish warmonger, who is not ashamed to boast that she count Henry Kissinger, who has the blood of untold millions on his hands, as a friend. She and politicians like her, regardless of their gender, should be thrown out of power, and replaced by those, who genuinely do understand and want to improve conditions for the poor and working people. And if the Dems had chosen Bernie instead Killary, we just might now have him as president and not the genocidal maniac inching the world towards nuclear holocaust.

Today Is International Women’s Day

March 8, 2017

It’s International Women’s Day today. According to Wikipedia, it was first started by the Socialist Party of America, who held the first Women’s Day in New York on February 28th, 1909. Following a suggestion by Luise Zietz at an International Women’s Conference in August 1910, it was then celebrated the next year in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland. It then spread to the Russian Empire, and became a formal day of celebration under Lenin and Alexandra Kollontai after the Bolshevik coup. It was then celebrated mostly by the Communist countries until 1975, when the UN inaugurated International Women’s Day.

The Wikipedia article gives its history as follows

The earliest organized Women’s Day observance was held on February 28, 1909, in New York. It was organized by the Socialist Party of America in remembrance of the 1908 strike of the International Ladies Garment Worker’s Union.[3] There was no strike on March 8, despite later claims.[5]

In August 1910, an International Women’s Conference was organized to precede the general meeting of the Socialist Second International in Copenhagen, Denmark.[6] Inspired in part by the American socialists, German Socialist Luise Zietz proposed the establishment of an annual International Woman’s Day (singular) and was seconded by fellow socialist and later communist leader Clara Zetkin, although no date was specified at that conference.[7][8] Delegates (100 women from 17 countries) agreed with the idea as a strategy to promote equal rights including suffrage for women.[9] The following year on March 19, 1911 IWD was marked for the first time, by over a million people in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland.[3] In the Austro-Hungarian Empire alone, there were 300 demonstrations.[7] In Vienna, women paraded on the Ringstrasse and carried banners honouring the martyrs of the Paris Commune.[7] Women demanded that they be given the right to vote and to hold public office. They also protested against employment sex discrimination.[2] Americans continued to celebrate National Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February.[7]

Although there were some women-led strikes, marches, and other protests in the years leading up to 1914, none of them happened on March 8.[5] In 1914 International Women’s Day was held on March 8, possibly because that day was a Sunday, and now it is always held on March 8 in all countries.[5] The 1914 observance of the Day in Germany was dedicated to women’s right to vote, which German women did not win until 1918.[5][10]

In London there was a march from Bow to Trafalgar Square in support of women’s suffrage on March 8, 1914. Sylvia Pankhurst was arrested in front of Charing Cross station on her way to speak in Trafalgar Square.[11]

In 1917 demonstrations marking International Women’s Day in Petrograd, Russia, on the last Thursday in February (which fell on March 8 on the Gregorian calendar) initiated the February Revolution.[2] Women in Saint Petersburg went on strike that day for “Bread and Peace” – demanding the end of World War I, an end to Russian food shortages, and the end of czarism.[5] Leon Trotsky wrote, “23 February (8th March) was International Woman’s Day and meetings and actions were foreseen. But we did not imagine that this ‘Women’s Day’ would inaugurate the revolution. Revolutionary actions were foreseen but without date. But in morning, despite the orders to the contrary, textile workers left their work in several factories and sent delegates to ask for support of the strike… which led to mass strike… all went out into the streets.”[5]

Following the October Revolution, the Bolshevik Alexandra Kollontai and Vladimir Lenin made it an official holiday in the Soviet Union, but it was a working day until 1965. On May 8, 1965 by the decree of the USSR Presidium of the Supreme Soviet International Women’s Day was declared a non-working day in the USSR “in commemoration of the outstanding merits of Soviet women in communistic construction, in the defense of their Fatherland during the Great Patriotic War, in their heroism and selflessness at the front and in the rear, and also marking the great contribution of women to strengthening friendship between peoples, and the struggle for peace. But still, women’s day must be celebrated as are other holidays.”

From its official adoption in Soviet Russia following the Revolution in 1917 the holiday was predominantly celebrated in communist countries and by the communist movement worldwide. It was celebrated by the communists in China from 1922, and by Spanish communists in 1936.[7] After the founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1, 1949 the state council proclaimed on December 23 that March 8 would be made an official holiday with women in China given a half-day off.[12]

The United Nations began celebrating in International Women’s Day in the International Women’s Year, 1975. In 1977, the United Nations General Assembly invited member states to proclaim March 8 as the UN Day for women’s rights and world peace.[13]

The theme of this year’s International Women’s Day ‘Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030’. The article then explains

In a message in support of International Women’s Day, the UN Secretary-General António Guterres commented on how women’s rights were being “reduced, restricted and reversed”. With men still in leadership positions and a widening economic gender gap, he called for change “by empowering women at all levels, enabling their voices to be heard and giving them control over their own lives and over the future of our world”.

A few weeks ago The Young Turks released the news that the organisers of the Women’s Marches in America were planning a Women’s General Strike against Trump. I don’t know if this is actually taking place, but there are a number of articles about it in today’s I newspaper. Including a report that the veteran feminist, Gloria Steinem, has called Trump a ‘walking violation of women’s rights’. Which is true, unfortunately.

So I’d like to give my best wishes to all the females readers of this blog on this special day.

Nye Bevan on Women Losing Out with Private Healthcare

February 13, 2016

Republicans Women's Rights

A few days ago I put up this meme, about the way the Republicans will force American women to refight all their grandmothers’ battles if they get in again. In my opinion, the meme probably refers specifically to abortion as the issue that most widely and obviously affects women’s health and legal freedom.

But it also covers a whole plethora of other areas and issues. The Republicans recently defunded Planned Parenthood, on the spurious ground that they were providing abortions and selling the body parts for science. In fact, only three per cent of the Planned Parenthood’s activities were abortions. The majority of them were general family planning and gynaecological/ women’s health advice and procedures, given to poor women, who clearly fell at least partly outside private medical care.

As for the bodies of the aborted children, they were not sold. They were donated for scientific research, and the fees charged by the organisation were for transport, not for the bodies themselves. I have very strong sympathies for the anti-abortion lobby, and frankly I’d rather no children were aborted except in cases of medical necessity. But the wider point here needs to be made: the claim that they were being sold was an emotive, retailed by the Republicans for their own benefit.

And there was more than an element of hypocrisy in the Republicans’ denunciation. One of those making it was Carly Fiorina, who herself sat on the board of a private healthcare company that did medical research using tissue from aborted foetuses. It all proves what a Conservative friend of mine used to say, ‘The Tory party is an organised hypocrisy’. I think he was quoting old Oscar Wilde, but it’s true, and applies on both side of the Atlantic.

Nye Bevan pic

Nye Bevan, the architect of the NHS, was also acutely aware of the way ordinary women suffered under the private health care system that put medicine out of the reach of the poor. In his chapter on the health service in his book, In Place of Fear Bevan writes

Much sickness and often permanent disability arise from failure to take early action, and this in its turn is due to high costs and the fear of the effects of heavy bills on the family. The records show that it is the mother in the average family who suffers most from the absence of a free health service. In trying to balance her domestic budget she puts her own needs last.

The Tories are keen on trying to promote themselves as the natural choice for women. It’s based largely on Maggie Thatcher, and the number of female Tory MPs. They’re also trying to show that, like Labour, they stand for female equality and empowerment. When it suits them, they make feminist noises about guaranteeing women equal pay and breaking the glass ceiling etc.

It’s all just noise. Women have been hit particularly hard by their wretched austerity programme, as the jobs that are traditionally done by women have seen their budgets cuts and jobs shed. And the Tories’ privatisation of the Health Service will also lead to women suffering particularly hard, as they neglect their own needs for the benefits of their families and children, just as Bevan saw it in the Britain of the first half of the 20th century.

And this also affects the current election campaign in America. Madeleine Albright and the veteran feminist leader, Gloria Steinem, have both urged women to vote for Hillary Clinton. She would clearly be a great feminist trailblazer if she got in. She’d be the first female president of the US. I also have no doubt that she would encourage more women to enter politics, and be particularly good for high-flying female executives like herself.

But Bernie Sanders’ programme for universal healthcare would be better for women generally, as well as men and children, by giving them access to health care which the present private healthcare system denies them. Just as the mass of British women benefited from the NHS.