Posts Tagged ‘Conservataives’

Alex Belfield on the Rejection of the Attempt to Found a Political Party

May 24, 2021

I’m sorry for posting it, but this video by the mad right-wing YouTuber and internet radio host Alex Belfield is interesting for what it says about the murky state of certain sections of Black politics and activism in the UK. The video dates from February last year, 2020, and shows Belfield celebrating the rejection by the Electoral Commission of an application by a group of anonymous individuals wishing to found a Black Lives Matter political party. This was made five months prior to the Electoral Commission’s final decision, following the death of George Floyd. The Commission turned the application down because it was likely to mislead voters. The official BLM organisation, now the Black Liberation Movement, denied that it was associated with the applicants. The manifesto did not describe the party’s structure or organisation and the party’s application left its structure and financial organisation incomplete. The application was also made by anonymous individuals, which also raises justifiable suspicions.

The application to establish a BLM party allowed Tory backbenchers to accuse Black Lives Matter of being a party political organisation with left-wing objectives. One was the destruction of the traditional family, the other was to have the police defunded.

Belfield also notes that this comes after various individuals in America have been sent down for embezzling donations to BLM across the Pond. The UK branch have also been denounced by smirking abomination Priti Patel and Sajid Javid. They also caused riots that have left hundreds of police officers injured. Belfield states, in my view absolutely correctly, that if they were White they’d be compared to the BNP, EDL or other Fascist organisation. But they are considered acceptable to the media because they are Black. Belfield says of all this that ‘there are shenanigans afoot’ that make him very afraid.

Belfield is an arch-Tory with a very toxic political bias. He wants the NHS privatised, or at least handed over wholesale to private management despite all the evidence showing that the health service’s problems are the result of privatisation and underfunding by the Tories. He believes that Colston’s statue shouldn’t have been torn down, and condemns other moves to removes or rename other monuments and institutions with connections to the slave trade or the British Empire. He hates Sadiq Khan and has instead promoted Laurence Fox and other right-wing rivals. His videos are full of sneers and invective against ‘left-wing oyster-eating, Guardian-reading, ambivalecious Naga Manchushy types’. Because he’s in some kind of very nasty dispute with the Beeb, which he’d like to defund, and obviously hates those presenters he views as left-wing, like Naga Manchetty.

But unfortunately here has a point. I think there are some very nasty shenanigans and corruption within certain parts of Black politics. And that this is not confined to the left.

The book Back from the Brink, published a decade ago, describes how the Tory party was brought back from the edge of political extinction by David ‘Dodgy Dave’ Cameron and the mass murderer of the disabled and unemployed, Iain Duncan Smith. Apparently, it describes how the Tories tried to build up a constituency within the Black community by recruiting certain ‘community leaders. Many of these turned out to be criminals, who ended up being sent to the slammer rather than parliament.

On the other side of the political spectrum, I’ve heard of members of anarchist groups leaving the movement after they noticed members of various drug gangs appearing at meetings. I also remember how there was so much corruption in Brent and Lambeth councils in the 1980s that they were hardly out of the pages of Private Eye’s ‘Rotten Boroughs’ column. The magazine even gave Brent the nickname ‘Bent’, just as it called Merseyside ‘Murkyside’ for the same reasons. And some of the organisations involved in the corruption were Black.

Now I am certainly not claiming that corruption and embezzlement is confined to the Black community, or that it is even prevalent within it.

You can see simply by opening the papers that isn’t the case. But where there is poverty, despair and marginalisation, whatever the colour or ethnicity of the community, you will also find crime. And criminals will seek an entrance into politics for legitimation and also to allow their activities to expand and continue without interference by the law. Hence the scandals way back in the ’70s or ’80 about corruption in the Met, and allegations since then that certain coppers have been taking bribes from criminal gangs to look the other way. And an organisation like Black Lives Matter, which has received considerable amounts of money from donations and has a radical antipathy towards the police, will be an attractive target for criminals.

It must, however, be noted that the group that wanted to found the Black Lives Matter political party weren’t connected to the proper, official Black Lives Matter movement. They are also not connected to Sasha Johnson’s wretched Taking the Initiative Party.

The Groan has published a piece about Sasha Johnson’s shooting. Apparently it was when she was coming back from a party at 3 AM Sunday morning. At the moment they’re working on the assumption that she may have been shot in mistake for someone else and that her political activism was not a motive. They also urge people not to speculate about the motives for her murder.

I dare say they’re right, though hanging over their request for people to refrain from speculating is the spectre of terrible race riots if someone comes to the unfounded conclusion that the attacker was racially motivated.

But it does seem to me that if her political organisations and activism is investigated, it might turn up some very unsavoury dealings or connections.

Sasha Johnson: BLM activist may have been shot by mistake (msn.com)

Ken Clarke and Malcolm Rifkind on the Incompetence of the Tory Leadership Candidates

July 7, 2016

Michelle sent me this link to the news footage, in which Ken Clarke and Malcolm Rifkind make unguarded and highly indiscreet comments about the challengers for the Tory leadership, including Michael Gove, Andrea Leadsom and Theresa May. Among the various unflattering comments, Clarke said he was glad Gove got rid of Boris Johnson, but thought that if Gove got in he’d have us fighting three wars at the same time. He though Leadsom was wrong in thinking we’d have a glorious future outside the EU, while Theresa May was a ‘difficult woman’, but then, he said to Rifkind, ‘you and I both worked for Margaret Thatcher.’

http://news.sky.com/story/watch-ken-clarke-ridicules-tory-candidates-10423744

Clarke’s right, far more than he knows or would agree to. All of the candidates for the Conservative leadership are appalling – extreme rightists, who do want to privatise the health service, destroy the welfare state, and return this country to the sweatshop conditions of the Victorian factory masters. They would wreck this country’s economy even further than Cameron and Osborne already have, all the while praising each other to the rafters for making Britain more competitive and entrepreneurial. It’s a race where they’re all equally wrong, and ideally should all lose.

From 2008: Private Eye on Bupa’s Reluctance to Apologise and the Explain the Death of One Woman’s Mother

July 23, 2013

Five years ago Private Eye carried this story about Bupa’s attempts to silence Dee Sedgwick and its reluctance to provide an apology and explanation for the death of her mother from the treatment she received at Highfield, one of its care homes in Halesworth in Suffolk.

‘Bupa

A Sorry Tale

News that Bupa chief executive Val Gooding is stepping down and leaving Britain’s largest private healthcare provider “in rude health” has angered one former client who has battled with the company for years over the death of her mother.

Three years ago the Eye reported how Bupa threatened legal action to halt Dee Sedgwick’s efforts to extract an apology and explanation for the company’s neglectful treatment of her mother, Joan Gaddes, in one of its care homes.

Mrs Gaddes, aged 82, had died in hospital in September 2002, a month after being admitted from Highfield, a residential home in Halesworth, Suffolk, suffering dehydration and weight loss. Pressure sores on her back and heels had become gangrenous.

In the weeks and days leading up to Mrs Gaddes’ admission to hospital, her daughter had expressed concerns about her failing health and loss of eight and about the company’s failure to do anything meaningful to reduce summer heatwave temperatures within the home. She had even asked for her mother to be placed on a drip because she appeared so dehydrated, only to be told it wasn’t necessary.

Angry that the care home and managers did not appear to be taking her complaints seriously Mrs Sedgwicfk had written to Bupa’s senior executives, including Val Gooding, at their homes, setting out her grievances. Bupa’s initial response was a hand delivered letter from City law firm Roseblatts, threatening legal action for harassment of staff who said they felt “threatened”. Undeterred, Mrs Sedgwick decided she too would deliver her letters by hand as well as by fax. “Quite frankly I would have liked them to take me to court to get a public airing of my complaints. But they were never going to do that,” she told the Eye.

Instead Bupa finally agreed to fund legal representation for the family and have a round table meeting with Paul Newton of Bupa’s legal department and Matthew Flinton, head of care services. Val Gooding was said to be on the end of a phone should it prove necessary.

The result? A three-page detailed letter of regret and apology, a damning indictment of the home’s care of Mrs Gaddes and a final vindication of Mrs Sedgwick’s prolonged fax and letter campaign to Bupa’s chiefs.

Bupa admitted not properly monitoring changes in her eight and health; not properly assessing her nutritional needs and fluid intake; and not taking proper care to ensure she did not develop pressure sores. “Had your mother’s weight loss and fluid intake requirements been properly assessed and monitored, it may have led to your mother’s health having been more closely monitored by the NHS. We apologise for this failure.”

It also went on to apologise for not carrying out an assessment before she entered Highfield, which Mrs Sedgwick maintained was not suited to caring for Mrs Gaddes, who had mild to moderate dementia; for losing her belongings including her false teeth; for not taking adequate steps to ameliorate the heatwave conditions at the home; for “unsatisfactory” administration of her medication; and for initially failing to provide key documents to those carrying out the independent inspections because they were “missing”.

“We also regret and apologise for the length of time, which it has taken to provide you and your family with appropriate resolution in respect of your concerns,” said the letter. It had taken five years.

Unfortunately Mrs Sedgwick’s battle is not quite over. The Commission for Social Care Inspection has completed no fewer than six versions of its report into Mrs Gaddes’ care, which Mrs Sedgwick says has failed to get to grips with what went wrong at Highfield – not least because the CSCI dismissed some of her complaints that have now been admitted by Bupa.’

Another example of horrific malpractice by one of the private firms hoping to take business from the dismantled NHS. Bupa’s refusal to respond to Mrs Sedgwick’s letters to them on the grounds that this was ‘harassment’ also sounds terribly familiar. Oh yes, it’s the reason the DWP under Ian Duncan Lies is not answering queries about the number of disabled people, who have committed suicide due to their assessment by Atos. It seems to be another trick the Conservatives have picked up from their friends in the private sector.