Posts Tagged ‘Blood Tests’

Going Into Hospital Tomorrow for Myeloma Treatment

June 18, 2018

This is to let you know that tomorrow I will be going into hospital for about 3 weeks for intensive treatment for myeloma. This is a kind of blood cancer, in which the bone marrow produces toxins called paraproteins. These can cause anaemia, and damage the bones and the kidney, as well as leading to loss of calcium. I was diagnosed with it September-October last year after a routine blood test by the doctor revealed I was slightly anaemic. She referred me to the haematology department of Bristol’s BRI, who commenced treating me.

This is usually done for 6-8 months using a variety of drugs, which are different from those regularly used to treat cancer, and which don’t have some of their side effects, like hair loss. This meant going to the hospital once a week for an injection of the anti-cancer drug, and taking a variety of drugs, including an antiviral, to control the side effects. Most of these were pills, though one of the drugs was an anti-coagulant, which had to be taken twice a day by injection.

After this drug treatment has reduced the paraproteins as far as possible, they then take you into hospital for intensive treatment using the conventional cancer drug. This damages the immune system. In order to get it back up and running, they take stem cells from your own blood, store them, and then give them back to you. This consolidates the effect of the previous cancer treatment, and adds more time to the period of remission before the myeloma returns. I’ve already had my stem cells collected, which took a whole day connected to something similar to a dialysis machine. I’m due to be given the drug, and then the stem cells this week. I’m then due to spend the next several weeks in isolation at the BRI to protect me from disease while my immune system is still weak, and so that they can monitor me and make sure that the stem cells are properly taking hold.

I’ve received excellent care from the staff at Bristol’s various hospitals, not only the BRI, but also the hospitals in Southmead and Whitchurch. You are allowed to bring books and DVDs into hospital, as well as use laptops. I shall be taking a laptop into hospital with me, and hope to continue blogging while I’m there, if I can. If I can’t, for some reason, this is why.

I was in hospital being given a phosphate infusion as part of the anti-myeloma treatment the Sunday last year, when the CAA, the Sunday Times and the other right-wing papers libelled Mike as an anti-Semite and Holocaust denier, which infuriated me at a time when I could well have done without it.

I also understand that a number of other people have also been diagnosed with myeloma after random, routine blood tests. I’d therefore advise people to make sure that they have these done, even though they can appear to be an inconvenience. It could save them from more serious health problems later on.

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Doctor’s Letter Attack Farage and Defending NHS in Today’s Telegraph

March 18, 2015

After Farage’s comments yesterday attacking the NHS and promoting private health, one doctor, John Lamport was so incensed that he had a letter describing his experience of excellent treatment for testicular cancer and defending the NHS. The doctor stated that his experience of NHS care had the opposite effect on his and convinced him to become a doctor. He was also unimpressed with Farage’s complaints about the NHS, when he personally had treated some of the courageous men and women, who had suffered horrific injuries and mutilation serving in the Middle East. Compared to their lost limbs, Farage’s own lost testicle was much less damaging.

He concluded his letter by stating that the NHS must remain for people, who suffer genuine tragedies. It should thus be well-funded, nationalised and free at the point of use.

Here’s the letter:

Lamport NHS Let

If you can’t read it, the letter says

Sir – When I was diagnosed with testicular cancer, I went from GP to operating theatre in four days. Unlike Nigel Farage, I endured nine months of chemotherapy, and I find it distasteful that his consultant referred to his regular blood tests as ‘more cruel than chemo’. The UK Independence Party leader’s experience shaped his belief that private medicine is best and immigrant doctors incompetent; my experience led me to become a doctor.

Reading Mr Farage’s whinge, I recalled caring for brave lads coming back from Afghanistan. If a 20-year old whose legs have been blown away can sit on my desks for weeks and show nothing but dignity, it puts the loss of a testicle into perspective.

Some people suffer genuine tragedies and it is for these people that the NHS is so crucial. It must remain well-funded, nationalised and free at the point of use.

Dr John Lamport,
National Health Action Party,
Kidderminster, Worcestershire

The National Health Action Party has been campaigning against the privatisation of the NHS since the 1990s. It was formed when Bliar was busy trying privatise the NHS, and wanted to close down one of the local hospitals in Kidderminster, despite massive local opposition.

Ed Miliband, on the other hand, has said that he will reverse Cameron’s privatisation of the NHS.