Posts Tagged ‘Birmingham Yardley’

Vox Political: Corbyn Critic Has Panic Room Installed at her Office

August 17, 2016

Mike over at Vox Political has put up a piece from the Guardian, reporting that the Jess Philips, a Labour MP for Birmingham Yardley, has had a panic room installed at her constituency office. She states that she does not feel welcome by large swathes of people in the Labour party, and stated that she would struggle to stay in the party if Corbyn won again, unless something changes in the way people were treated online, in the streets and our security. She later denied that she was planning to quit.

Mike in his comments to the piece wondered who’s paying. He made very clear that no one in a job that doesn’t involve risks to their life, like MPs, should have to fear for their lives. He also makes it clear that he wouldn’t threaten her, or would want to follow through on any threats she had received. But he makes it clear that she is a vocal critic of Corbyn, and a very abrasive character, as was evident from her Twitter feed. Which meant that he was also sick of her unparliamentary behaviour.

I started wondering how far the installation of the panic room represented genuine fears, and how much it was all part of the theatre of victimhood the Blairites have been acting out every since they rebelled. We’ve had Angela Eagle claim that a brick was thrown through her office window, when it wasn’t. A brick was thrown, but it went through the window of shared staircase. There’s nothing to connect it to any Corbyn supporters. We’ve seen people from the Portman PR heckle Corbyn at a gay rights demo, and then claim that this represents popular feeling against him. And then there were the inflated stories about Corbynites hold demonstrations outside other anti-Corbyn MPs offices, when they were simply marching past. And it just seems to carry on. And as Philips is an abrasive character, there is a part of me that thinks she’s brought it on herself. She’s shown a willingness to gratuitously insult and upset people – I assume. I’m not on Twitter. And if she does that, then perhaps she shouldn’t be too surprised at the consequences, particularly as she must be aware that there are some very dark parts of the internet. Again, this makes me wonder how genuine her supposed fear is. After all, if the abuse she’s receiving is bad, you wonder just how much worse the abuse far more famous trolls like Louise Mensch and Katie Hopkins are getting from the people, who loath and despite the rubbish they mouth. Hopkins herself goes out deliberately to upset and offend, and has caused numerous scandals and outrages. But I haven’t heard of her claiming that she fears for her safety. Quite the opposite. Hopkins seems to be one of those vile people, who thrive off any abuse they get, which is why I don’t want to give her any publicity. But at the same time, she’s a national figure while Philips, I suspect, is still quite obscure to most people.

So while part of me feels guilty about the blaming the victim, I do wonder how far she genuinely fears for her life, and whether this is just another stunt at fake victimhood to smear Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters.

Vox Political: Labour MP Jess Phillips Accuses David Cameron of Colluding with Child Molesters, Doesn’t Apologise

February 15, 2016

Mike over at Vox Political has put up another piece, this time from the Independent, reporting that the Birmingham Yardley MP, Jess Phillips, has attacked David Cameron for block education on sex and relationships for school children. She has accused Cameron of colluding with child abusers. Even more frightfully, she has not apologised! Cue howls of Tory outrage! See

Labour MP Jess Phillips refuses to apologise after accusing David Cameron of ‘colluding with child abusers’

Mike states she’s absolutely right. She is. And I back her 100 per cent. This isn’t the first time Phillips has said something controversial about rape and sexual assault. The good Burghers of England’s second city, Birmingham, got very upset the other week when she said that every week there were incidents on one of the city’s streets like the rape of 200 women by immigrants in Cologne and other European cities at Christmas. There were howls of outrage and accusations of racism. But Yasmin Alibhai-Browne, in the Independent, defended her, and pointed out that what she actually said was very cautious and not at all racist or anti-Muslim.

Now if you read the papers, some universities are already holding classes for students on sex and relationships in order to keep their female students safe. It’s also done in America. I’ve got a feeling that it, or similar measures designed to keep women safe, have provoked outrage amongst the American Right. The American right-wing radio host, Rush Limbaugh, was ranting a little while ago how anti-rape legislation meant that men would have to get written permission from a woman before having sex with them, even though the legislation he objected specifically said that wasn’t necessary so long as the woman had made it clear she consented to sex, either verbally or through her body language.

Now I can imagine that some blokes will be sceptical of such education on the grounds that it seems to be based on the assumption that all men are rapists. I’m sure this isn’t the case. But there is a problem in that young people are under increasing pressure to have sex, and this pressure can lead to date – and outright rape. I also have to say that the thought of sex and relationship education would have traumatised me when I was at school. What we were taught in the fourth year at senior school when we did ‘relationships’ was depressing enough, covering as it did teenage orgies and marital break up, but not in any way that was at all titillating or alluring. Quite honestly, given how depressing the material is, I’m surprised there aren’t more people in this country, who haven’t gone the same way as the Japanese and sworn off sex and dating for the joys of computer games. Perhaps there are, but British machismo demands they lie about it. Either way, it seems education like this is needed. And however controversial Phillips’ claims about sexual assault in her constituency are, if they’re being made by her constituents, they need to be taken seriously. She’s only doing what a constituency MP should do – listen to the people she’s elected to represent, even if what they’re saying is uncomfortable and not something we want to hear. Just ’cause the truth hurts, don’t mean it ain’t true.