A Up Let’s Talk on Why We Support Jeremy Corbyn

This is a great, impassioned video from A Up Let’s Talk, whose name and accent mark him out as a proper Northerner. In this video, he tells the Labour party why so many people support Jeremy Corbyn. He starts with clips from the great man’s career, such as his speeches in parliament against the invasion of Iraq and how he was arrested for being offensive to the South African ambassador during apartheid. There’s footage also of him praising trade unions for defending workers, millions of whom are now earning below the minimum wages, and praising the NHS and the people who work in it. A Up Let’s Talk contrasts this with the Tories, and New Labour, who are just out for corporate profits and what they can get for themselves. Jeremy Corbyn has support because he fights for what Labour was founded for, and for the issues that actually mean things to ordinary men and women. He also talks about the issues that aren’t reported so much in the news, like the Panama papers, and the massive corruption that revealed. The press gave this, he said, a bit of coverage, just to make it look like they were interested in the same things ordinary people were interested in, and on their side. But they aren’t and they’re not.

He also attacks the way the Blairites have not given any reasons for their attacks on Corbyn, and concludes, as have very many others, that there are none. They’re attacking him for what he is, and what he represents. And rather than complaining that he was a bit too quiet about Europe, he challenges them to come up north, and explain to the marginalised, working class communities why they should vote for him and Labour, and not for UKIP. Many people left the Labour party following what New Labour turned it into, but they’ve returned under Corbyn. They should be listened to, as they were in the party before New Labour, and before so many of the Blairites were even born. He doesn’t expect great changes from Corbyn, or to be massively better off, but he does want a better, more equal society, and that is why he took part in a march this Saturday for Corbyn with his children. He asks New Labour what they have done for people like him and the rest of us workers. He would like to see some ‘quantitative easing’ for himself and other working class people, and not for the bankers,for whom David Cameron went to Brussels to get money. As for the other leading Tories, Theresa May wants to spy on everyone. And he notes how the Tories seem to be coming apart and disintegrating. Boris Johnson is supposed to be the most popular politician in Britain, but where is he? A Up Let’s Talk states that they’re all rats leaving a sinking ship. And Corbyn can win. So let’s rally around Corbyn.

A Up Let’s Talk is exactly right about all of this, and he’s identified all the issues. The Blairites haven’t presented any arguments, just personal attacks. They do stand for the same things as David Cameron – increased power and profits for the rich and corporations, more poverty and deprivation for the rest of us. Issues like the Iraq invasion, apartheid, workers’ rights, the minimum wage, and the health service have immense importance for ordinary people. And the press has shown itself to be hostile to the organised working class, disguising their hatred with a few, token articles. The Tories were and are bitterly divided on Europe, and they are disintegrating. Robin Ramsay in his ‘News from the Bridge’ column in Lobster described just how far in decline the Tories are as a popular party. Most of their members of are of pensionable age, and there are only 150,000 as opposed to half a million plus in Labour. They haven’t had any interest in genuinely improving conditions for the working class since the mid-19th century and the middle of the 20th in the Coalition government. Theresa May, the probably next leader of the Tories, does want to spy on everyone. She is a threat to civil liberties. New Labour did betray everything that the Labour party originally stood for, and turned away from the working and lower middle classes to concentrate on winning votes in swing marginals. People did leave Labour because of them. Between 1997 and the 2000s Labour lost five million voters. They’re coming back under Jeremy Corbyn. And the rise of UKIP in northern constituencies – and elsewhere in England – is partly explained by many members of the working class feeling that Labour has abandoned them. The embrace of UKIP as an alternative, however, is counterproductive. There are very good, left-wing reasons to be sceptical of Europe. Lobster and Counterpunch have over the years run very many excellent articles on the highly dubious nature of the EU and the corporativism and Cold War politics behind it. But Farage and the Kippers as they are as just as zealously against the working class as the Tories, if not more so. And the country’s ills are due not so much to immigration or to the EU as to forty years of neoliberalism, wage cuts, and attacks on workers’ rights, welfare benefits and the NHS from the governments of Thatcher, Major, Blair and Cameron. It’s a vote for the same kind of people that have carried out these policies, while scapegoating migrants and asylum-seekers.

Corbyn isn’t going to introduce massive changes, or make people vastly more wealthy. But he will do his level best to make us a more equal society, and give working people back at least some of what they have lost, and a renewed voice in parliament.

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One Response to “A Up Let’s Talk on Why We Support Jeremy Corbyn”

  1. A Up Let’s Talk on Why We Support Jeremy Corbyn — Beastrabban’s Weblog | Mark Catlin's Blog Says:

    […] via A Up Let’s Talk on Why We Support Jeremy Corbyn — Beastrabban’s Weblog […]

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