Jeremy Corbyn on the Chilcot Report in Counterpart

Counterpunch, the American radical Left magazine, has published a transcript of Jeremy Corbyn’s remarks to parliament on the Chilcot report yesterday. Mr Corbyn duly pays tribute to the hundreds of British servicemen and women, who have been killed in Iraq, as well as the hundreds of thousands of Iraqis. He states the war was not, as Chilcot has concluded a last resort, and it has vindicated the 1.5 million people across the whole spectrum of British society and politics, who marched against the war. He mentions specifically in this the late Labour politician, Robin Cook. He describes the way the war destroyed Iraq, and the lethal sectarianism that it has provoked. He also reminds parliament that those who marched against the war knew how terrible Saddam Hussein’s regime was, and had protested against it, when Thatcher’s government had been supporting it. They protested against the war because they knew that Hussein’s Iraq was not a threat and the pretexts offered in the report were ‘flimsy’. He states that the principle cause of the war was the desire to follow the Americans into a conflict that was both unprovoked and colonial, and cites the general Major General Michael Laurie, who said that the army knew at the time that the dossier was to make the case for war, rather to produce unbiased evidence. Corbyn also makes several recommendations to prevent such a situation occurring again. This include great supervision of the security and intelligence services, strengthening the position of the cabinet, and giving parliament the ultimate power over the decision to go to war. He also wants greater legal controls and supervision over drone strikes.

Corbyn in his statement before the House mentioned that he had been meeting the families of some of the British servicemen and women killed during the War, as well as Iraqis, and was going on afterwards to meet more of them. He also announced his intention to consult the British public and Iraqis about the decision to send this country to war.

The article is at: http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/07/06/the-iraq-war-was-an-act-of-military-aggression-launched-on-a-false-pretext-on-the-chilcot-inquiry-report/ It deserves to be read.

Corbyn is, of course, entirely right, though his remarks are likely to provoke opposition. Lobster, the parapolitics magazine, has argued from its very beginning that the intelligence services, including British, are out of control. In the case of Britain, they are at best incompetent, at worst, murderous, as shown by their collusion in a ‘dirty war’ of assassination and extra-judicial execution of Irish nationalists in Northern Ireland.

As for strengthening parliament and the cabinet, the Tories themselves complained at the way Tony Blair was intent on reducing the powers of both, to create a powerful, centralised ‘presidential’ post of Prime Minister. Nevertheless, they will oppose his demands to make parliament, not the prime minister, responsible for the decision to go to war. I’ve already found a book written by a Tory MP against such a proposition in Waterstones. I can’t remember the title, nor the author, but its argument was that taking the decision away from the Prime Minister would weaken the country’s ability to defend itself. I can see the logic behind it, but I think it comes from that part of the Tory party that still hankers after imperial glory, when Britain’s armies conquered one sixth of the world’s land area. I also think that while it might slow down decisions to go to war, it would make such decisions much more democratic and, more importantly, correct, both morally and for reasons of national security. After all, Blair’s invasion of Iraq demonstrates the powerful reasons for this. It was undemocratic, and not justified either morally or for reasons of national security. Hussein was a thug, but he was not a threat. Other Middle Eastern nations regarded his regime as a joke. The decision to go to war was made purely on cynical, economic and political grounds, in which plundering the country of its oil and profitable state industries figured largely.

A stronger parliament and cabinet may not prevent such unjust wars happening again, but they will be another constitutional check in the British system of constitutional checks, to make such arbitrary and bloody decisions less likely.

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2 Responses to “Jeremy Corbyn on the Chilcot Report in Counterpart”

  1. vondreassen Says:

    Nobody has mentioned the role of bullyboy media Owners, who deliberately misinformed the publc and heavily promoted the war

  2. vondreassen Says:

    Reblogged this on vondreassen.

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